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Apple Case Study Analysis 2013 Oscar

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Case Studies

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Forget the Oscars, the Baftas, the Grammies and the Brit awards, in academic publishing circles there is little to beat the annual case awards from the European Case Clearing House (ECCH).

This year’s overall winner is a study of Apple Computer by two professors from Warwick Business School in the UK, Loizos Heracleous and Angeliki Papachroni. The case, Strategic Leadership and Innovation at Apple, has already been used by 31 organisations in 17 countries, according to Warwick dean Mark Taylor.

Harvard Business School, the business school with the largest portfolio of cases, won three awards, in the finance and accounting, economics and politics, and entrepreneurship categories - the last of the three for another case on Apple. Insead, which has campuses in Fontainebleau, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, was the other multiple winner, picking up awards in the ethics and marketing categories.

For his case on Zara, the fashion retailer, Felipe Caro of the Anderson school at UCLA won both the new case writer award and the production and operations management category award.

Last week the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) also announced the winners of its case competition - with a different line-up.

The Ivey school at the University of Western Ontario, Canada’s biggest case writing school, scooped three of the awards, including one in the Indian management category and another in the category for Latin American business cases. Insead, IMD, in Switzerland, and the Copenhagen Business School all won in two categories.

Case studies are often the bread-and-butter teaching material for business school professors and in spite of the increase in online and distance learning, the number of case studies published continues to proliferate. “Schools that traditionally excel in the case method are still producing winners, but no longer dominate the (ECCH) Awards,” points out Richard McCracken, Director of ECCH.

www.ecch.com

www.efmd.org

Della Bradshaw

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